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20130117
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Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)
elections, is thinking fast or has been over the past two weeks of the popularity threshold and angela merkel has been riding and both of their parties are dithering. the sbc slightly inching higher and the sdu inching lower and they're both losing ground in a grander scale. it's the small parties that are the winners, definitely the green wes a record high of over 13%. they're the ones that won the election and lost it for the cdu, not stoeshl democrats themselves. and the liberals, the sdp, many had counted them out and there was an expectation or there was a fear for some that they couldn't even make the century hurdle that you need to get into parliament. they beat that. about you also for the personality ratings and the criticism on a federal scale, but that was his home turf so there was a lot of sympathy vote going in there. the big parties will have to look carefully for coalition partners. the social democrats will try to align themselves with the green that might not be enough. the stronger the greens get, the more the social democrats usually lose and something similar you h
-than-expected showing in tuesday's elections. near-final totals showed his bloc and its allies had only 60 of 120 seats in parliament. netanyahu signaled he'll reach out to a new centrist party that made a strong showing. it favors a new focus on making peace with the palestinians. this was election day in jordan. voters cast ballots in the country's first parliamentary elections since the arab spring. the new legislature will have more power, including the ability to choose the next prime minister. some two million people were eligible to go to the polls. turnout estimates varied from a high of 56% to as low as 47% as the day went on. several islamist groups boycotted, saying the election was stacked against them. but the prime minister dismissed their actions. >> ( translated ): the weakness of the turnout, if it exists, and i am not saying that, nobody should think that it is because of the boycott. it is not correct. otherwise anyone would think if there was any hesitation for the elections it's because people were neither convinced with past elections nor with the performance of the past parliamen
elected by the people is being sworn in to office. just before noon at the capitol, barack obama will take the oath for his second term as president. this is a ceremonial swearing-in because the constitution requires the president to be sworn in on january 20th, and this year the 20th fell on sunday. so the president took the official oath in private yesterday in the blue room at the white house. the oath administered by the chief justice john roberts, jr. the public swearing-in and all the pomp and circumstance that go with it were put off until today and what a day it is. the temperature right now is in the high 30s. the sky is clear, a brilliant winter's day in the nation's capital. people are pouring into the national mall to witness a day of history. the first family began the day by attending services at st. john's church. that's right across the street from the white house. that's a long-standing tradition for presidents on inauguration day. joining me now in our cbs coverage is bob schieffer, our chief washington correspondent and anchor of ""face the nation."" bob, what
, and they're not totally in love with his first term. he just beat his rival in the election. >> people have lower expectations, so i think we're going to -- he may try and raise that a little bit. this will be a lot of poetry, and the state of the union address is going to be the prose where he really lays out the agenda. >> let's bring in the auth aror the book "barack obama the story" and margaret hoover, republican consultant and cnn contributor. david, what are you expecting to hear? >> i think there's a paradox here, which is that four years ago there were huge crowds and so much ebullience of the moment. he gave such a wintry speech. today there's smaller crowds, i think he's giving a more optimistic speech. i think he feels he's in a much better place today than he was four years ago? >> cornell? >> i think we'll hear some of the things picked up from the campaign. he's got to talk about the economy, talk about the number one issue to americans, and that's jobs and expanding and growing the middle class. we're looking at a middle class that continues to shrink, and it's something tha
: big election day today. voting is underway in israel for the country's next leader, current prime minister benjamin netanyahu voting today. expected to win re-election but with a smaller majority than in 2009. results are expected in this afternoon and we will have them for you live whether they happen. bill: in our country now the president setting up the next round of big budget battles. mr. obama defending the role of government in reaffirming support for major entitlement programs, the drivers of her debt like medicare, medicaid and social security, leaving many to wonder if any of d.c.'s spending will decrease. in fact democratic senator chuck schumer already suggesting that taxes may need to go up again to pay for all those bills and all that spending. stephen hayes, senior writer, "weekly standard", and fox news contributor has been on this. steve, good morning to you. how are you doing, post inauguration day? >> doing well. bill: give us a sense about what we can expect to happen in your town next. >> well, i think very little. you're looking at a spending, spending trend
it because he doesn't have to worry about getting re-elected. >> well, he wasn't concealing anything. he's a progressive democrat. i loved the speech yesterday because of what he didn't say. he very often goes into this kind of airy dreaming of how we'll just transcend partisanship. well, we won't. politics is partisan. washington is partisan. it was for president clinton who wanted to campaign that he was there, campaigned saying i want to be a uniter, not a divider. our president said, he offered a vision that republicans should sign on to. they used to be tough when i was a kid. now they are just whiny. he reached out to them plenty in his first term and all they did was spit in his eye. >> i think when it comes to comprehensive immigration reform, i think the president can work with senator marco rubio. but what about on climate change? what about same-sex marriage? is there going to be cooperation in those two areas? >> number one, on same-sex marriage, the president hasn't thrown any weight behind legislation or for repealing the legislation that paul's because, bill's boss signed
. the clerk: house resolution 42. resolved, that the following named members be and are hereby elected to the following standing committees -- the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the reading is suspended. without objection, the resolution is agreed to and the motion to reconsider is laid on the table. for what purpose does the gentleman from georgia rise? the house will be in order. please take your conversations off the floor. the house will be in order. please take your conversations off the floor. the house will be in order. please take your conversations off the floor. the gentleman from georgia is recognized. >> thank you, madam speaker. i ask unanimous consent that when the house adjourns today it adjourn to meet at 2:00 p.m. on friday, january 25, 2013, and when the house adjourns on that day it adjourn to meet at 1:00 p.m. on tuesday, january 29, 2013. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. the chair now announces the speaker's appoint pursuant to sections 5580 and 5581 of the revised statute, 20, u.s.c., and the order of the house of january 3, 2013, of the follow
and government, monica, you can put all your cards on the table for a midterm election, if you take control of the house you have two years of an open playing field. do yo think that is the strategy? >> absolutely. it is all about 2014. remember the president had the run of the field in his first two years before the house flipped to republican control. he misses that. and what he wants for his legacy is, as he said in 2008, the fundamental transformation of the nation. by that he means turning america into a european-style socialist state or social democracy. he had the run of the field for the first two years. he wants his last two years as president to be exactly that. so everything he is doing is geared toward flipping the house of representatives back to democratic control. and if you're the republican party, not just the national party but right on down to the state and local levels, bill, here's what you do. you focus on the house. you focus on individual districts. you focus on how you can retain control of the house and pick up seats. bill: focus on the majority, right? >> focus on
on the foreign relations committee, his work with dick lugar to ensure free elections in the philippines, his work with bill frist on aids in africa, his work as chairman of the new start treaty and his very public and successful diplomatic interventions in afghanistan, pakistan and sudan. i think one day historians will judge his senate years in temperatures terms of his impact on foreign policy much the same way so many recognize senator ted kennedy's impact on domestic policy. from his many years in the u.s. senate, john has developed a very personal understanding that we represent not just states or government but also people. i once asked john why he loves the senate. he said, it's the pride he feels in trying to get things done for people. for three years now, he's been working quietly to help a father from newton, massachusetts, colin bauer, whose two sons were kidnapped and taken to egypt. john even called former president mubarak and had a screaming match with him about it. five times he's been to egypt since then and every time colin has been at the top of his list in every meeting.
taxpayers to manage their own budget when elected leaders fail to do sthosme house has passed a budget each of the last two years. the other body must do theirs if we are going to control the out of control spending. for years the senate has gotten away without passing a budget but they have found time to pass laws that increase spending. s that terrible way to run a government and i support this bill which will pay for bills already obligated. we have to stophe political gamesmanship occurrg here in this town and work together to find common sense solutions to cut spending and find savings in our budget. i look forward to passing this bill that will finally hold congress accountable and begin put -- putting america on a debt repayment plan and stop future generation from paying for the mistakes of the past. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from michigan. mr. levin: can i ask how much time is remaining on both sides. the speaker pro tempore: yes, you may. this secret from michigan has nine and a half minutes, the other secret from michigan has five and a half minutes and
time as we approached an election. americans are still entitled to be told the truth. did you select embassador rice? >> i did not. although i have not had a chance to testify, i have seen the resulting debate. you are right. it was a terrorist attack. what caused it? that is what we did not know. we did not know what their motives were. after months of research, it was made clear the picture remains still complicated. i say that because in the unclassified, i " key questions surrounding the identity and motivation of the prepared -- of the perpetrators remains to be determined. i recommend all staff read the classified version, which goes into greater detail. i cannot speak to its. it goes into greater detail becausebut where a variety of pl causes and triggers afford it. and there's evidence the attacks were pre coordinated and not necessarily indicative of an extensive planning. i personally was not focused on talking points. i was focused on keeping our people say. as i said, i have a very serious threat environment in yemen. we have people getting over that wall at the cairo, do
with a number of newly elected libyan parliamentarians. they were optimistic about building a democracy, creating a vibrant economy, and restoring fundamental human rights for libyan people. he was as enthusiastic as they were about the prospect. there is no question he will be missed by all who knew him and who worked with him. one of the things that troubles me, madam secretary, is the hoops we on this committee have had to jump through to get to the facts surrounding the deaths of the public servants. the state department has delayed and delayed coming forth with information when this committee was finally presented with relevant data it had amounted to what could be called a document dump, hundreds of pages of paper in wide disarray in no particular order in terms of relevance or chronology often in duplicate but in different binders making it very difficult to locate documents that were of any help. our public servants if libya who were murdered on september 11th, and it is now january 23, more than four months later, it is unacceptable the accident has made it so difficult for con
the opportunity to join him for a dinner with a number of newly elected libyan parliament aryans. they were optimistic with creating the economy and restoring human rights for the people. he was as enthusiastic as they were about the prospects. no question he will be missed by all who knew him and worked with him. one of the things that troubles me is the hoops we on this committee had to jump through to get to the facts surrounding the deaths of these public servants. the state department has delayed and delayed coming forth with information. the committee was presented with the data, it amounted to what was called a document dump. hundreds of pages of paper in wide disarray in no order in terms of relevance and chronology in duplicate and different binders, making it difficult to locate documents of any help. our public servants in libya were murdered on september 11. it's now january 23rd. more than four months later. it's unacceptable that the state department made it so difficult for congress to exercise the oversight and responsibility. a couple of questions. within a couple of months
in washington, d.c. and the president-elect of the american academy of child and adolescent psychiatry. she has taught and published and barry rosenfeld is professor of psychology and director of clinical training at fordham university. he is a clinical forensic psychologist, whose recent work has focused on assessing the risk of violence in patients. i barry rosenfeld, i'd like to start right there. what's the problem that we need to understand in trying to determine in advance who might be capable of violence as we saw in new toub? >> well, the essence of the problem is that it's a needle in a stay stack. so we've got almost an infinite number of people-- i shouldn't say infinite-- a very large number of people who will fit any profile we might generate and we want to find the one person who's potentially going to be homicidal. there just isn't really a way statistically to identify or clinically to identify that person with any real accuracy. >> brown: dr. joshi, does that mean such limits we can't know what can be done? >> the issue, however, is that young children and adolescents who somet
and right now the regime has no legitimacy because last year it was overthrown. the democratic elected president of mali was overthro byroops who had been trained by american trainers, now there is an interim government. i mean if you can look at the government of mali, i mean it's so bad it makes the government in kabul look good by comparison. i mean this is a very dysfunctional regime that has a hard time winning the support of its people. so along with the security, you have to enhance the legitimacy of the regime so that people in the north will be able to turn away even if there is a security offensive into the north. even if the french are able to make gains in the north they're to the going to win the support of the people unless they're championing me kd of governme that those people respect and right now understandably they have zero respect for the government, which exacerbated by the fact that the people in the north are twareg and you have black africans there is a lot of tribal ethnic, various other divisions. so you have to have an international push to create a more inc
before the election and didn't want to ruin that talking point. those in the white house obviously say it was purely for intelligence reasons they were not confident enough in the intelligence at that point to say to a certainty that without question it was a terrorist attack by such and such group, and in addition they did not want to let any of the bad dguy that they were wise to them. >> dana, i was surprised how tough senator mccain and rand paul was. neither one minced any words in going eafr tafter the secretary state. i suspect that's going to be a prelude before she testifies this afternoon. there are republicans on real t questions for her as well. >> there certainly are. in a way i actually am not that surprised. i know you've seen john mccain get even more aggressive with the person on e other side of the deus sitting in the witness chair. ran paul likely has aspirations for higher office but, yes, absolutely. that always tends to be kind of the atmosphere here on capitol hill. the house, they're kind of more rabl rousers for lack of a better way to say it. i was told today
government to election toss try to get in there and help them with security, because it was clear that that was going to be one of their highest needs once they finally got stabilized. so there were a number of meetings. and i personally, i went to libya in october of 2011. i spoke with the then leadership, i met with them in international settings. we sent teams out, both civilian and military experts to try to help them. until recently, while they were going through their transitions it was a very difficult conversation because they didn't have, you know, the authority they thought. but now we're beginning and we have a long list of ways that we're trying to help improve security in libya. >> for example the october 2011 meeting at that meeting did this issue come up with regards to the inability of the libyan government to protect our institutions. did that come up at all in that conversation? >> we obviously talked a great deal about the deteriorating threat environment in libya. one of the reasons we had our own people on the ground, and why we were looking to try to figure o
to libya to observe the elections and at that time on july 7th he expressed to me his deep and grave concerns about security, particularly in benghazi. and he continued to communicate with the state department and i don't know who else was privy of those cables about the deep concern of security there and the need for additional assistance and i will argue with facts that after that event took place, after the fall of gadhafi, the, quote, soft footprint was partially, to some degree, responsible for the tragedy that took place. the american people and the families of these four brave americans still have not gotten the answers that they deserve. i hope that they will get them. >> well, senator, i understand your very strong feelings. you knew chris, you were a friend of chris. you were one of the staunch reporters in the efforts to dislodge gadhafi and try to give the libyan people a chance and we just have a disagreement. we have a disagreement about what did happen and when it happened with respect to explaining the sequence of events. we did get to talk to the ds agents when they
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)